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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
the problems here, the father of the -- [inaudible] then like bob lovett and david bruce, smart guys. you've got a problem. and he says, you know, and you to get rid of dulles, allen does. his brother, john foster dulles, sector essay, a little harder to fire him, but more importantly, ike said it takes a strange kind of genius to run an intelligence service. and he's right about that. and allen dulles did have a strange kind of genius. so ike was reluctant to get rid of them. so he did. i think he regretted. susan's dad told me after the u2 got shut down he went to his father on the plane, the paris summit about to collapse her some, and said to him, dad, you should have fired back i. and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president and you're not. but it was little defensive about it because, yeah, he probably should have. these things are always clear in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. he had no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow in his own administration in his
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
last point because my mind is on -- of course to say we need to learn about bob and these guys, locke's second treatise of government comes out of -- who argues for monarchy. and monarchy is looking better and better in the middle east. if there's one country that seems to have figured it out, so far, is morocco. and maybe that should be a model for other places in the region as well. >> thank you, bret. brian. >> my basic arguments for our side of the debate, an argument for reality of opening your eyes and seeing where we are today, two years into these uprisings and these changes. and in a region of the world just narrowly focused on the middle east which has about 20 countries, you have seen political change at least the leadership in four of them. in two of those countries we've seen islamist forces come to power through the ballot box. in the two others, islamist political parties are playing some sort of role, more marginal in libya. we are at the start of the process, and i think our response from washington has been very sort of philosophical and intellectual but not very ope
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
president, and like bob lovett, david bruce, smart guys, warn him, you got a problem here, and he says, you know, and you ought to get rid of dallace. he's the brother of john foster, secretary of state, but more important, really, he says it takes a strange kind of genius to run and intelligence service, and he's right about that, and allen did have a strange genius so ike was reluctant to get rid of them, begs to question to replace with whom? he did. i think he regretted it. john eisenhower told me that after the u2 was shot down, he went to his father on the plane to the paris summit about to collapse, the paris summit, and said to him, dad, you should have fired that guy, and ike blew up and basically said i'm the president of the united states, but it was a little defensive about it because, you know, he probably should have gotten rid of dulles. they are clearer in retrospect than they are at the time. ike was a great manager, but he was arguably a little slow to get rid of people. i think not in world war ii, no problem with sacking generals in world war ii, but maybe a little slow
] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing
't clear minded enough or clear eyed enough about the russians. bob gates also, who had moved over to deputy national security advisers. that little group kind of delayed the process for six months because the people in state were ready to progress with what had been achieved at the end of the second reagan administration. but it really delayed things. the person who turned that around who also deserves a great deal of credit was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an interagency management, and different players, and spent a good deal of time, would arrive in moscow with an entourage, with the negotiators, jim woolsey from csc, the relative assistant secretary, broke them into working groups and continue the process raws participated in, there was a delay. i don't think there were any problems as a result. >> just wanted to say james baker was named secretary of state the day after george bush was selected. within a week he met with regional assistant secretaries to understand their priorities. my priorities were opportunities and challenges to include ea
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
to avoid the sequestration. >> bob samuelson, "washington post". i think the proposals are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000, and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there's much speculation thamuch speculr cuts in the pentagon budget would reduce the additional cuts in both the army and the marines. if the marines was put in a position where it had to occupy and protected the oil field of the persian gulf for an extended period of time say five or six years are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons at least i was able to get through as chairman is to try not to speculate much on hypothet speculate much on hypothetical. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now, and i think they are in the 13 budget, so basically they have been on the hill, the beginning of them they have been on the hill for the better part of a year and they are reductions both of chiefs of those to services and the chairman also. clearly, and i did as well when i was the chairman over year ago, there was a need to come down. there was an expectati
counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to come about to write this book. >> good afternoon. i would like to thank the committee on law and national security for giving me the opportunity to work on this book project. if he told a couple of years ago , i was still at college that soon thereafter are be working gun national security policy book, would have told you were crazy. i have been to a number of committee events in the past and i often hear panelists described that only now we seem national-security will really come into its own separate field and seeing enterprises like welfare in national security loan center will reviews and journals popple ball
other countries. that's why bob dole and captain dan pe berzynski want us to appe this treaty. i've heard nothing from the other side that outweighs the reality of that consideration for persons, not just veterans, all persons with disabilities. what's really at stake here is big. the outcome here will not, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disability. this treaty will help offer hope where there is none. the united states could actually sit
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
efficiency. so we were able, bob teets before me begin that effort, achieved about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to reveal for greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now i ask that question when i first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary vis-À-vis the service chief? the reality is there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there's an important role for them to play in terms of a particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> as the defense department does the downsizing services committee consider cuts to the number flag and general officers? >> again, i think that's part and parcel as he do force reduction. as i said, we are going to be reducing the force structure in the army to 490,000. the reduced the marines as well and i
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18